Breast Procedures

  • Breast Biopsy (Open and Core Needle) – A breast biopsy is a procedure in which a sample of breast tissue is removed and examined under a microscope to check for breast cancer. There are several different types of breast biopsy procedures:
    • Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) – a small needle with an attached (empty) syringe is guided into the skin, into the lump, and then fluid and cells are withdrawn into the syringe for further testing.
    • Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) – similar to the FNAB, but uses a larger needle with a cutter attached to remove a small piece of tissue for further testing.
    • Excision Biopsy (surgery) – requires cutting the skin and removing a larger sample of the lump (or the entire lump) for testing.

    To learn more about breast biopsies, visit WebMD.

  • Mastectomy (Partial / Lumpectomy and Modified Radical) – A mastectomy is the surgical removal of the breast, or part of the breast, and, sometimes, associated lymph nodes and/or muscle tissue.  Depending on the characteristics of the tumor and the breast, as well as your overall health, Dr. Fore and you may choose one of the following types of mastectomies:
    • Simple or total mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue but does not remove the muscle tissue under the breast.
    • Modified radical mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue as well as fatty tissue and levels I and II of underarm lymph nodes. The underlying muscle tissue is not removed.
    • Radical mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue, fatty tissue, levels I, II and III of the underarm lymph nodes as well as the chest wall muscles under the breast.
    • Partial mastectomy: Removal of cancerous part of the breast tissue, as well as some, but not all, of the surrounding tissue.
    • Subcutaneous (“nipple sparing”) mastectomy: All of the breast tissue is removed, but the nipple is left alone – performed less often than simple or total mastectomy because of associated risks and complications.

    To learn more about mastectomies, visit emedicinehealth.com

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