Breast Procedures

  • Breast Biopsy (Open and Core Needle) –¬†A breast biopsy is a procedure in which a sample of breast tissue is removed and examined under a microscope to check for breast cancer. There are several different types of breast biopsy procedures:
    • Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) – a small needle with an attached (empty) syringe is guided into the skin, into the lump, and then fluid and cells are withdrawn into the syringe for further testing.
    • Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) – similar to the FNAB, but uses a larger needle with a cutter attached to remove a small piece of tissue for further testing.
    • Excision Biopsy (surgery) – requires cutting the skin and removing a larger sample of the lump (or the entire lump) for testing.

    To learn more about breast biopsies, visit WebMD.

  • Mastectomy (Partial / Lumpectomy and Modified Radical) – A mastectomy is the surgical removal of the breast, or part of the breast, and, sometimes, associated lymph nodes and/or muscle tissue. ¬†Depending on the characteristics of the tumor and the breast, as well as your overall health, Dr. Fore and you may choose one of the following types of mastectomies:
    • Simple or total mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue but does not remove the muscle tissue under the breast.
    • Modified radical mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue as well as fatty tissue and levels I and II of underarm lymph nodes. The underlying muscle tissue is not removed.
    • Radical mastectomy: Removal of the entire breast tissue, fatty tissue, levels I, II and III of the underarm lymph nodes as well as the chest wall muscles under the breast.
    • Partial mastectomy: Removal of cancerous part of the breast tissue, as well as some, but not all, of the surrounding tissue.
    • Subcutaneous (“nipple sparing”) mastectomy: All of the breast tissue is removed, but the nipple is left alone – performed less often than simple or total mastectomy because of associated risks and complications.

    To learn more about mastectomies, visit emedicinehealth.com

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